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20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
is really to educate the commissioners and staff and to start focusing on some sensible ways in which some of these technology glitches can be capped ended. gerri: educate the staff. high-frequency trading has been around for awhile. it seems to me these folks should know everything about it. why don't they? >> i think there is clearly a lag time between when government becomes aware of technological advances and when it starts to understand them fully. i'm not justifying the time frame that has gone on because we have had these problems, as you pointed out, for over two years now. but i think the government is well advised to proceed only when it knows what it is actually doing, rather than just jumping into the freight. gerri: a point. and here's what they will talk about tomorrow, preventing errors in trading car responding to market crises once they have occurred, so it will take this on with people who are inside the industry and people who are critics of the industry. how should they go about either regulating this or changing it or fixing it because you know as well as i do that inv
regulations that we'll be better off. i've got a different view. i think we've got to invest in education and training. i think it's important for us to develop new sources of energy here in america, that we change our tax code to make sure that we're helping small businesses and companies that are investing here in the united states, that we take some of the money that we're saving as we wind down two wars to rebuild america. and that we reduce our deficit in a balanced way that allows us to make these critical investments. now, it ultimately is going to be up to the voters, to you, which path we should take. are we going to double down on the top-down economic policies that helped to get us into this mess, or do we embrace a new economic patriotism that says america does best when the middle class does best? and i'm looking forward to having that debate. >> moderator: governor romney, two minutes. romney: thank you, jim. i'm pleased to be at the university of denver, appreciate their welcome and also the presidential commission on these debates. and congratulations to you, mr. president
to cut education funding. kneel nemo all right. we clipped the first part of that, but the president was referring to the comment from mitt romney get the government out of the whole college loan business or cutback on it, that kids could go to their parents, ask for money for college, and that was something that the president really zeroed in on. mitt romney said that was not what he meant and all of that, but he came back with the comment, you're not entitled to your own facts. ed, you were watching this very, very closely, former mcdonald's usa ceo. o delivered the goods tonight? >> wow. the american people won clearly, but romney really brought it home. you can see it very clearly. do you want to double down on the failed policies of obama, or do you want to embrace a clear vision from a businessman that has leadership skills, strategic vision, and can take the country where it needs to go? as a small business guy who used to run a billion dollar company, i tell you, it's miserable right now. if obama thinks for a minute we're not going to find ways around the health care bill, h
will be in the red by a billioo dollars next year and another frightening number, 71 fed out of every education dollar in illinois goes to paying teacher retirement costs, how can they justify that amount of money? >> people who care deeply about education in illinois and around the country really needs to understand the only way you'll have the kind of resources for public education, for health care, is in the public employee unions come to the negotiating table and writes down the overly generous packages the average teacher who retired last jun june 2011 with a 30-year career had $1.6 million in cash when retired. the median income is $30,203, just an unfair burden on working class people. ashley: do you think this issue is getting a lot of play in the presidential campaign? i unfunded pension liabilities is a massive, massive problem but i get a sense it is not getting that much attention. >> i would be surprised and asked about it tomorrow night, but they absolutely should. very bad decisions, tarp, the auto bailout and of course the stimulus in january 2009 were crisis decisions. reporter
to be the pensions, i told you sucking up 71-cents out of every education dollar in illinois. political theater indulged here did not address of unfunded teacher pensions. that is what i'm talking about that is me talking about the chicago teacher union settlement with rahm emanuel, and all of the political theater that and all of the political heater that attended, and as a to you at that time, it is all about, all about the pensions and the pensions pay for them. and the governor is now quoting the idea of a federal bailout of illinois mentioned that. can you believe this stuff? and mean, a little -- just all little decency here, folks. announcing the state's fiscal 2012 budget last year governor quinn said he would seek a federal guarantee of its unfunded liabilities. sounds harmless enough, but ask about it back then. the governor claimed to bailout language was a precaution. now he calls it a drafting error. others try to call it a trial balloon. how big is the illinois problem? it has $8 billion in current outstanding debt. 8 billion. you say, okay. 8 billion. we live in a land of $16 tri
our education up to speed. you are looking for chemists. are we turning out enough ms ms they need dramatic improvement. many of us who are active in the city and region, both that the primary level and secondary level with science education. liz: how do we get people to be interested in science and engineering? >> it takes good curriculum, good teachers and good schools. as we all know, teachers can make all the difference in turning on student curiosity. it really takes a whole number of things to really come together. liz: how to look at what is happening today? unemployment dropped to 7.8%. on the surface, it looks good, some people question it. what do you see out there in the trenches as a business leader? >> well, in all honesty, there are a lot of people who are unemployed, there are actually quite a few who are underemployed. there is no question the economy is not creating as many good, solid high-paying jobs. liz: they always ask business people what the problem is and they say uncertainty. >> i do not think it is as much uncertainty. you have to have an increase in dema
factory direct. >> we were factory direct because we had to educate people. we had to educate people how using whole foods. the people get it. whole smoothie trend is growing at incredible right. i just got numbers. in month of september, 43% of house heads had a smoothie and prepared a smoothie in their home. on average, that is 250 million smoothies were made. >> we love smoothies i want to get back to the working with a group like amazon. are you competing with them and their discounts because they discount pretty deeply. >> right now the demand for people wanting the vita-mix is so strong we have to be in as many doors as possible. interesting thing it is not all, there is vita-mix for you as consumer. if you are high-end consumer and love to cook and love the recipes from the chef you will shop in williams-sonoma. that is where you find the perfect vita-mix for you. if you're looking at deal for amazon that will get a great deal to fit. >> we're profiling like the hope diamond. it is up there. 500 bucks, jody for a blender. what does it do that is so great? why do i need that instea
at sustainably good returns for savers. without a job, people won't be able to buy a home or pay for an education ire irrespective of te current level of interest rates. >> saying the federal reserve is watching inflation, has the tools to combat it. he says it's not an issue right now. he also discussed milton friedman saying ben bernanke is a fan of mil torks saying freedman would have supported the feds aggressiveness and targeting of liquidity. he said back in 2009, the reason he believes that is because freedman says japan should by securities back in 2000. ben bernanke, a fan, and says he would be supportive of the current fed today. david: i was a friend of milton, and ben bernanke is no milton, i can tell you that. thank you so much.3 better economic news pushed the markets up, but does the rally really have legs? lauren: joining us a john manly, wells fargo chief equity strategist, and in the pits of the cme, scott bower senior market strategist. hey, guys. >> hello. >> how are you? lauren: why didn't we hold the highs of the session? what's this manufacturing report? okay, we're not shr
to incorporate responsibility. education is the main reason people spend money around the world. >> about 21 transactions a second. we moved about $150 billion yearly. the main reason for the people moving money from one country to another country is education, supporting their loved ones, sending money every transaction. sending the people back to school. sending their children back to school. about 61 million children worldwide that have no access to education. to support that, we made a commitment saying from the money standing, those that have made a commitment thing we would like to pull the people back to school. giving the children the opportunity to create economy growth worldwide. a million days of school for the children. up to $10,000 a day. it is a huge commitment. customers tell us that they knew that. lori: tell me about the amount of money being sent around the world and the pace that is moving. >> it does help us a lot. 2009 crisis -- we already knew that job creation and investment the company went down. the money was sent less. we saw already in some countries that earn mon
to say. education costs different from medical facilities but the key thing is right now the traditional construction project only 20% of what gets put into the final building price point why is material. 40% is a risk and overhead. we want to reverse that equation. we are more like boeing. quality manufacturing and the attitude is if bowling can assemble a 737 in a matter of days why does it take 24 months to get health care clinic? ashley: how these structures come? i they and flat pack can you put it together? >> precisely. they're so important to us because that construction mean that is affordable to ship and we are not shipping boxes of air and we put panels up. imagine a high end building. it goes up quickly but we don't have to sacrifice on column free space for ceilings or daylight or air quality. it is that component approach that allows us to put something out that looks high end like it is the architecture. ashley: anyone else coming into the fold? >> largest health-care providers out there buying the buildings and the race for distributed health care and affordable health ca
to be successful and economy has 70% of the it based on consumers driving pricing and value we'll have to educate consumers how to buy it. today the wrong people pay for it and wrong people buy it. businesses pay for it, government pays for it and insurance companies buy it. we have no consumer engaged in the game to understand value. david: you know what milton friedman used to say? the best way to find a price for something take out the middleman. you have the service provider and service resee every, did receiver, those two make a deal. we have so many middlemen including much bigger government proehl than we ever had before. >> this was started by medicare in '65, incented every hospital or provider to establish their own costs for the very same procedures. david: how do we get better pricing into the system. >> we have to make it transparent. therefore for consumers to be engaged they have to know what they're buying. david: by the way, one anecdote. lawyer rein has hers. i have mine. my wife was in the hospital for quite a bit of time. she had 10 physical therapy sessions eeach one cost 150
where we will be. make sure our kids are educated so they are able to contribute to a strong economy. we have to make sure we are doing the right investment we need to have a strong economy. a future orientation, not always looking backwards. i think it is an important thing for economic oc makers to think about as well. >> so, a lot of questions about the dollar. i guess the best way to some of these questions would be, what are your concerns about the value of the dollar and maybe related to have the various quantitative easing effort at some point, was a drive down the value of the dollar? >> when people talk about the dollar, they often confusing two very different ideas. i think it is important to him and wish them a little bit. the first idea is the buying power of the dollar. how much can the dollar buy in terms of goods and services when you go to the grocery store, you know, when you go to the mall, where ever you are shopping. the measure of the dollar that matters for that definition is inflation. i talked about inflation in my speech. inflation in the united states has been a
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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